SEA - SEA CREATURES - SEA GODS AND GODDESSES
Stories, Folktales, Folklore, Fairy Tales, Legends,
Myths, History, Nursery Rhymes, Fantasy & Facts


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SEA - SEA CREATURES - SEA GODS/GODDESSES
Stories, Folktales, Folklore, Fairy Tales, Legends,
Myths, History, Nursery Rhymes, Fantasy & Facts

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• Online Links to Stories/Info-Sea-Creatures-Gods
• SOS: Searching Out Stories-Sea-Creatures-Gods
Advice, Comments and References from Storytellers,
Teachers and Librarians



ONLINE LINKS TO STORIES AND INFORMATION ABOUT THE
SEA - SEA CREATURES - SEA GODS AND GODDESSES

Online links are in blue and underlined. Click on them for more information.
Story titles are in quotation marks.
To retell any of the stories, get permission from the copyright holder if the material is not in the public demain.


http://www.mauigateway.com/~rw/myths1.htm
Hawaiian (Maui) stories connected with the sea


http://www.odinscastle.org/odin8.html
The Bastion — New England Sea History and Information. Odin's Castle of Dreams and Legends.


http://www.prairieghosts.com/ocean_mary.html
Legends — Ocean-Born Mary: A Classic Tale of Haunted New England


http://members.tripod.com/~Motomom/sea
Strange Navy and Sea Tales and Nautical Terms


http://www.pibburns.com/tgness.htm
The Great New England Sea Serpent


http://www.simonpure.com/sea.htm
Connecticut and the Sea from Simon Pure Traditions (radio program)


http://www.downtosea.com/serpents.htm
Sea Serpents from Out of Gloucester


http://www.downtosea.com/fishstory.htm
Fish Stories from Out of Gloucester, MA


http://www.mysticseaport.org/learn/lo-resources.htm
Books containing sea stories from Mystic Seaport, CT


http://users.primushost.com/~ack/ack/
Atlantic Coastal Kayaker — Stories of kayaking and the sea


http://ctct.essortment.com/seamyths_rjrw.htm
Old sayings and myths from the sea


http://www.st.rim.or.jp/~cycle/SACHIE.HTML
Japanese myth: The Palace Under the Sea


http://www.jinjapan.org/kidsweb/folk/urashimataro/urashima1.html
http://home.clara.net/wabei/xlation/quilt/urashima.htm
http://www.darsie.net/talesofwonder/utaro.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ma3/mythology/utaro.html
Japanese folktale: "Urashima Taro" (with animated color illustrations) (different versions)


http://faerymists.tripod.com/fytales/urataro.htm
Urashima Taro and the Turtle, a Japanese folktale

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SOS: SEARCHING OUT STORIES AND INFORMATION ABOUT
THE SEA - SEA CREATURES - SEA GODS AND GODDESSES
Advice, Comments and References from Storytellers, Teachers and Librarians
(excerpts from Storytell posts plus original research)

Book titles and online links are in blue and underlined. Click on them for more information.
Story titles are in quotation marks.
To retell these stories, get permission from the copyright holder if the material is not in the public domain.
Storytell posts are added chronologically as they are received by Story Lovers World.

1) Query:

We are researching sea stories for a programme for littlies at a local Sea Life Centre. We are doing pretty well with some European mermaid tales and Liz is going to use a particular favourite of mine - "Urashima Taro." However, she has been asked to find tales featuring a dogfish and a stingray! Can anyone help? Also, if you have any short songs about sea creatures that would be great, too.
Ghislaine W.

Responses:

a) If you can get the book Twenty Tellable Tales: Audience Participation Folktales for the Beginning Storyteller by Margaret Read MacDonald, there is a great sea creature tale called "Little Crab and his Magic Eyes," which I have used a LOT. Perhaps you could put in some stingrays and dogfish in it? I have also been telling "Leviathan and the Fox" from the book While Standing on One Foot: Puzzle Stories and Wisdom Tales from the Jewish Tradition by Nina Jaffe and Steve Zeitlin. The fox is tricked by two fish, a Swordfish and a Sea Bass. Could they be changed to "your" fish?
Neppe P.

b) Having heard many creative American versions of his name, I hope you use the Japanese pronunciation: ooRAHsh'ma TAHro.
Fran S.

c) One of Kipling's Just So Stories (Classic Literature With Classical Music. Children's Favorites) is "The Crab that Played with the Sea." Flanders & Swann wrote a song about a sea-horse.
Philip A.

d) Try "The War Between the Sandpipers and the Whales" from Margerat Read McDonald's Peace Tales. When the whale cousins come to the island, I stop and ask the audience "Who were the cousins of the whales?" Lot's of time I hear of everything and anything from under the sea - so if the audience does not name them you certainly can add dogfish and stingray! Just be sure to give equal time to naming the sandpiper cousins too! I also get everyone to join me in taking big bites out of the island like the whales, but I illustrate how to use your hands when pretending to be the birds that are spitting back the sea - just in case we have some literal interpretations in the group.
Allison C.

e) Peggy Seeger used to sing this. Seems like you could write couple of new verses that would work. The tune is nice, and the chorus singalongable.

The Boston Come-All-Ye
Come all ye young sailormen listen to me, I'll sing you a song of the fish of the sea.
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

Oh, first came the whale, he's the biggest of all, he clumb up aloft, and let every sail fall.
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

Next came the mackerel with his striped back, he hauled aft the sheets and boarded each tack.
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

The porpoise came next with his little snout, he grabbed the wheel, calling "Ready? About!".
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

Then came the smelt, the smallest of all, he jumped to the poop and sung out, "Topsail, haul!".
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

The herring came saying, I'm king of the seas! If you want any wind, I'll blow you a breeze.
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

Up jumped the tuna saying, "No, I am the king! Just pull on the line, and let the bell ring."
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

Next came the cod with his chucklehead, he went to the main-chains to heave to the lead.
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

Last come the flounder as flat as the ground, saying, Damn your eyes, chucklehead, mind how you sound!
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.

Then, up jumps the fisherman with a big grin, and with his big net he scooped them all in.
Then blow ye winds westerly, westerly blow; we're bound to the southward, so steady she goes.
Tim Jennings

f) I love that song, so thanks for putting that melody back in my hand to hum and sing all day!
Dvora S.

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Created 2005; last update 9//29/09

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