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KOREA - KOREAN
Stories, Folktales, Folklore, Fairy Tales, Myths, Legends, Fables,
Nursery Rhymes, History, Classics, Fun Facts and General Information

INDEX
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Books about Korea-Korean Stories - Children
Books about Korea-Korean Stories - YA & Adults - Reference
Toys, Games, Costumes & Gifts - Korea - Korean
Online Links to Stories/Info about Korea & Koreans - All Ages
SOS - Searching Out Stories/Info about Korea and Korean Folklore
...
Advice, Comments and References from Storytellers,
...Teachers and Librarians



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BOOKS ABOUT KOREA - KOREAN STORIES - CHILDREN

Korean Children's Favorite Stories

Year of Impossible Goodbyes Korean Children's Stories & Songs


Book titles are in dark blue and underlined.
Click on them to get more information.
To retell these stories, get permission from the copyright holder if the material is not in the public domain.
In performance, always credit your sources.
Alphabetized with short descriptions for your convenience and to save you research time.

Deer and the Woodcutter (The): A Korean Folktale by Kim So-Un and Jeong Kyoung-Sim.
(2005 - Ages 4-8)
When you hear a rooster crow at the break of dawn, remember this story of the lovelorn woodcutter. After a deer teaches him how to gain a wife through treachery, the woodcutter finds a bride. But fate soon plays a nasty trick of its own.


Green Frogs (The): A Korean Folktale by Yumi Heo. (2004 Ages 4-8)
Two green frogs love disobeying their mother. They always do the opposite of whatever she tells them to do—they stay in bed when she wakes them, they make a mess when she asks them to clean. They're so contrary, they even croak backwards!

In the Moonlight Mist: A Korean Tale by Daniel San Souci with Eujin Km Neilan (illus). (1999 - Ages 9-12)
When a young woodcutter saves a deer from a hunter, the deer offers to grant him a wish. The woodcutter wants a loving wife and family more than anything, but believes he is too poor to marry. The enchanted deer grants him a heavenly maiden of a wife and before long the happy couple is blessed with a child. But soon, homesick and seduced by the heavens, the wife and child return to life among the stars, leaving the poor woodcutter earthbound and alone.

Korean Children's Favorite Folk Tales by Peter Hyun. (1996 - Ages 9-12)
This book presents a glimpse of the fantastic images and tales that occupy the minds and hearts of Korean children. The folktales gathered here are the most representative of Korean children's folklore and the book is a compilation of favorite Korean folktales among adults as well as children. Korean people have grown up listening to these folk tales for centuries. They share dreams, hopes, wit and wisdom for children of all backgrounds.

Korean Children's Favorite Stories by Kim-So-Un and Jeong Kyoung-Sim. (2004 - Ages 9-12)
Korean Children's Favorite Stories is a captivating collection of Korean folk tales that have thrived for generations. Some are unique to Korea, while others echo those told in other countries. Written with wit and pathos, they reveal the follies of people everywhere and expose the human-like qualities of animals and the animal-like qualities of humans.

Korean Children's Stories And Songs by Peter Hyun. (1996 - Ages 9-12)
It is hoped that through the publication and dissemination of books such as this, that the children around the world will learn that they are very much alike. These stories are created by three authors--Kim Yo-sup, Lee Hyun-ju, Yoon Suk-joong. This book, with many colorful illustrations, provides wonderful insight into the Korean culture through the stories and songs that have been passed down through the generations.

Korean Cinderella, The (Trophy Picture Books) by Shirley Climo with Ruth Heller (illus) (1996 - Ages 4-8)
The story of Pear Blossom, a lovely girl who is sorely mistreated by her nasty stepmother and stepsister.… At once comfortingly familiar and intriguingly exotic, the text is especially noteworthy for its instructive but unobtrusive incorporation of Korean words. Notable 1994 Children's Trade Books in Social Studies.

Korean Folk & Fairy Tales by Suzanne Crowder Han. (2006)
Korean stories that have been passed down from generation to generation through spoken and written traditions. Dragons, ghosts, ogres, tigers, demonic foxes, supernatural spouses and people with all their human frailties are among the characters that populate Korean folktales. Through them are revealed perceptions of life and notions about power, money, justice, love and interpersonal relations that, through the ages, have become ingrained in the Korean pysche.

Korean Folk Tales (Oxford Myths and Legends) by James Riordan. (1994 - Ages 9-12)
Here are Dan-Gun, the first emperor, whose mother was a bear; Shim Chung, who sacrificed herself to the sea to restore her father's sight, and the magistrate who tried to steal the Dragon King's daughter. The traditional Korean tales in this collection are full of amazing events and characters. Sad, happy, romantic, and funny, together they bring vividly to life the magic of Korea.

Korean Folk Tales; Imps, Ghosts, and Fairies.: Imps, Ghosts, and Fairies (Tut Books) by Pang Im and Yuk Yi. (1971)
Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. The publisher is republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Land of the Dragon King and Other Korean Stories (The) by Gillian McClure (illus). (2008 - Ages 4-8)
A long, long time ago, the sea wasn’t salty, pigs didn’t have short snouts, and rabbits were missing their fluffy tails. How the sea grew salty, pigs got their snouts, and rabbits their familiar fluffy tails is revealed in this sparkling collection of Korean folk stories. Gillian McClure’s delightful reworkings of well-known fables transport readers of all ages to an exotic world of tigers, rice cakes, and persimmons.

Mole's Daughter, The: An Adaptation of a Korean Folktale by Julia Gukova. (1998 - Ages 4-8)
This sly Korean folktale features a family of moles: exquisite daughter (whose eyes sparkle in very unmolelike fashion), protective mother, and proud father. As the daughter is the fairest of all creatures, her father wants her to marry the most respected and powerful of husbands. "The sky is the limit,'' he intones and proceeds to offer his daughter to the heavens. But the sky tells him the sun is mightier still, so the father pleads his case there...

Moles and the Mireuk, The: A Korean Folktale by Holly Hyeshik Kwon with Woodleigh Hubbard (illus). (1993 - Ages 4-8)
A Korean version of the frequently retold tale of a mouse whose proud parents, looking for the mightiest mate for their "perfect'' child, go from their own king to sun to cloud to wind to a wall that can be undermined by their own kind, with the result that another mouse is deemed the most powerful and appropriate suitor of all.

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Princess and the Beggar (The): A Korean Folktale (Scholastic Hardcover) by Anne Sibley O'Brien. (1993 - Ages 4-8)
Impatient with his daughter's constant weeping, a sixth-century king threatens to marry her to the beggar Pabo Ondal. The princess challenges her father to carry out his threat and goes to the reclusive beggar. In time, she teaches him so well that he goes to court and wins a poetry contest...

Rabbit And the Dragon King: Based on a Korean Folktale by Daniel San Souci with Eujin Kim Neilan (illus). (2006 - Ages 4-8)
In this story, it is the rabbit's heart that the Dragon King must have in order to survive. Both author and illustrator add humorous innuendo and bits of drama as the turtle sets out on his search and then persuades the rabbit to be taken to the bottom of the sea. The story builds nicely as the rabbit embarks on the underwater journey as adventure and then reaches the understanding that she is expected to die for the cause.

Rabbit's Escape (The) by Suzanne Crowder Han with Yumi Heo (illus). (1995 - Ages 4-8)
This adaptation of a Korean folktale is bilingual, with text appearing in both Korean and English. When the Dragon King of the East Sea falls ill, the court physician declares the only cure to be the liver of a rabbit. The loyal turtle volunteers to fetch one and tempts the rabbit with tales of the dazzling sea kingdom and a promise of meeting the Dragon King. But when the rabbit recognizes the trap, he escapes by using a clever and traditional ruse: he claims to have left his liver at home and offers to go get it...

Rabbit's Judgment (The) by Suzanne Crowder Han with Yumi Heo (illus). (1994 - Ages 4-8)
In this lively retelling of a Korean folktale, a tiger in a deep pit begs a man to help him out, but the wary man refuses. The desperate tiger promises no harm, so the man helps the beast, who immediately licks his chops in anticipation of his dinner. The man pleads for a second opinion of the tiger's plan...This is a good book for discussion, with notes on the story and the Korean alphabet.

Seven Brothers & the Big Dipper and Hungbu, Nolbu and the Magic Gourds (Korean Folk Tales for Children, Vol 4) (Korean Folk Tales for Children, Vol 4) by Duance Vorhees, Mark Mueller and Pak Mi-Son. (1990 - Ages 4-8)
Tales in English/Korean. 1) Seven brothers help their widowed mother with such devotion that they become the seven stars in the Big Dipper. 2) Two brothers, one kind-hearted and one mean, plant some gourd seeds that, when opened, reveal the difference between the fruits of greed and compassion.

Sun Girl (The) and the Moon Boy, The: A Korean Folktale by Yangsook Choi. (1997 - Ages 4-8)
"A long time ago in Korea, there was not enough light. It was before the sun and the moon had been created." So begins one of the most treasured folktales of Korea. Reminiscent of Little Red Riding Hood, this ancient tale reveals how a hungry tiger tries to trick a young boy and girl into thinking that he is their mother. But their sharp wits and a measure of good luck are enough to save the children and reunite them with their mother, high above in the sky.

Tales of a Korean Grandmother: 32 Traditional Tales from Korea (Tut Books. L) by Frances Carpenter.(1989 - Ages 9-12). Includes Story for Sale.
A Korean grandmother tells her grandchildren the traditional tales and legends of their country.

Tiger (The) and the Dried Persimmon (Korean Folk Tales) by Janie Jaehyun Park. (2002 - Ages 4-8)
A hungry tiger plots to steal an ox from the village. Outside a small cottage, the tiger overhears a mother calming her baby with the offer of a dried persimmon. The tiger mistakenly assumes that a dried persimmon is the wildest and fiercest beast in the world — because the mere mention of it quiets the child instantly. When a thief jumps on the tiger’s back, the terrified tiger runs off to his mountain convinced the fierce persimmon is after him.

Year of Impossible Goodbyes by Sook Nyul Choi. (1993 - Ages 9-12)
In 1945, Sookan and her family must endure the cruelties of the Japanese military occupying Korea. But police Captain Narita cannot break their spirit. Sookan's father is far away with the resistance movement and her brothers are in labor camps. Her mother works in a sock factory and Sookan herself must attend a Japanese school. Then the war ends. Their only hope for freedom lies in a dangerous escape to American-controlled South Korea.

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BOOKS ABOUT KOREA - KOREAN STORIES - YOUNG ADULTS and ADULTS - REFERENCE

To retell these stories, get permission from the copyright holder if the material is not in the public domain.
In performance, always credit your sources.
Book titles are in dark blue and underlined.

Click on them to learn more about the books and how to buy them.
Alphabetized with short descriptions for your convenience and to save you research time.


UNICEF project
Letter From a Korean Village, A (Korea Save The Children Federation & UNICEF Project) (1987)
A beautifully illustrated comprehensive book about the villages, lifestyles and customs of Korea. It includes maps, foods and food preparation, homes and construction, music and songs and instruments, games and ceremonies, temples and religion, birth and family, schools and learning methods, and so much more. A treasure of little-known information.


Pictorial Korean Folktales, The: Tangun, the Founding Father of Korea, Ko Chu-mong, the Founder of Koguryo by Kim Chang-wan with Kim Ui-hwan Chang Jim-young (illus). (1986)
Full color illustrated boards, illustrated end papers, 46 pages, fully illustrated with amazing color drawings and text in both Korean and English.


Sing 'n Learn Korean: Introduce Korean with Favorite Children's Songs / Norae Hamyo Paeunun Hangugo (Book & Cassette) by Bo-Kyung Kim and Selina Yoon. (1997)
This book and cassette introduces Korean to children the fun and natural way using many familiar melodies as well as native children's songs from Korea. Children will enjoy learning basic vocabulary and pronunciation through popular themes such as greetings, numbers, family, animals, weather, colors and more.

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TOYS, GAMES, COSTUMES and GIFTS - KOREA - KOREAN


Products are listed in dark blue and underlined.
Click on them to go directly to the Internet for more information about the products and how to buy them.
Alphabetized for your convenience and to save you research time.


Egypt, Korea, Russia, USA Math Poster Set
Add a colorful source of knowledge to your classroom with these beautifully illustrated and instructive 23 1/2" x 34 1/3" posters. Each poster details the contributions of the featured culture to the field of mathematics--learn how China helped develop the Base Ten System, the role Africa played in developing a system of measurement, and more. 16 posters.

Korean Boy Outfit
Dramatic play just got more exciting! This Korean boy outfit can enhance and support multicultural education. Comes with information cards describing the fabric, its country of origin, and suggested activities to help children learn about cultural differences and similarities. Wash separately in cold water, hang to dry.

Korean Girl Outfit
Dramatic play just got more exciting! This Korean girl outfit can enhance and support multicultural education. Comes with information cards describing the fabric, its country of origin, and suggested activities to help children learn about cultural differences and similarities. Wash separately in cold water, hang to dry.

Korean Hanbok & Shoes ~ Made for 18" American Girl Dolls
Traditional Korean Hanbok made in a floral brocade with an over jacket in yellow satin, trimmed with white and red. Matching Korean shoes are the perfect accessories.

Madame Alexander Korea, 8", International Collection Doll
Our prized International Collection continues Madame Alexander's pledge to educate children by celebrating the wonderful diversity of the world's cultures and traditions.
Add a colorful source of knowledge to your classroom with these beautifully illustrated and instructive 23 1/2" x 34 1/3" posters. Each poster details the contributions of the featured culture to the field of mathematics--learn how China helped develop the Base Ten System, the role Africa played in developing a system of measurement, and more. 16 posters.

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ONLINE LINKS TO STORIES AND INFORMATION ABOUT
KOREA - KOREAN FOLKTALES and FOLKLORE

Online links are listed in light blue and underlined. Click on them to get more information.
To retell these stories, get permission from the copyright holder if the material is not in the public domain.
In performance, always credit your sources.
Story titles are in bold.
Alphabetized for your convenience and to save you research time.



• Korean artwork from redbubble.com
http://www.redbubble.com/people/ujean1974/art/1564839-2-the-sun-and-moon-korean-folk-tale

• Korean Folktales
http://www1.korea-np.co.jp/pk/folktale/category41.htm

• Korean Folk Tales
The Disobedient Frog; The Rabbit's Judgment; Two Brothers; Why the Sea is Salty
http://park.org/Korea/Pavilions/PublicPavilions/KoreaImage/hangul/litera/

• Korean Folk Tales: Imps, Ghosts and Fairies — Translated from the Korean of Im Bang and Yi Ryuk by James S. Gale. (1913)
49 stories included
http://www.scribd.com/doc/3142297/Gale-Korean-Folktales-

• Korean Literature, Mythology & Folktale Resources create by Peggy Beck Haines
http://www.chlive.org/pbeck/eastlibrary/KOREANLITERATUR&FOLKTALERESOURCES.htm

• Korea Society - Korean Studies
http://www.koreasociety.org/korean_studies/school_visits/storytelling_korean_folktales.html

Story Spirits (The) from Aaron Shepard's website
http://www.aaronshepard.com/stories/060.html

The Tigers of the Kumgang Mountains: A Korean Folktale, retold by Kim So-un with Jeong Kyoung-Sim (illus) - a Google book
http://tinyurl.com/c5n7ku

• Type Index of Korean Folktales (Ch'oe) and Index of Tales translated in this book
http://tinyurl.com/c2f3yw

• Wikipedia: Janghwa Hongryeon jeon
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janghwa_Hongryeon_jeon

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SOS - SEARCHING OUT STORIES ABOUT KOREA AND KOREAN FOLKTALES and FOLKLORE
~Advice, Comments and References from Storytellers, Teachers and Librarians

Book titles are in dark blue and underlined. Click on them to get more information.
To retell these stories, get permission from the copyright holder if the material is not in the public domain.
In performance, always credit your sources.
Attributions and dates prior to 2005 are not included.



• Korean folktale:
KYON-U THE HERDER AND CHIK-NYO THE WEAVER
Synopsis:

In a land beyond the stars lived a lovely princess named Chik-nyo. She was the only daughter of the king. Because she liked to weave, she was called Chik-nyo, the weaving maiden. After looking for a bridegroom for the princess, the king found a perfect match for his daughter, the neighboring country’s prince. Because he was a herder, he was called Kyon-u, the Herder. Both countries arranged the marriage and they got married. Kyon-u and Chik-nyo were advised by their parents to be an exemplary couple. However, after the marriage the couple was so in love and they neglected their duties. Chik-nyo’s father was a strict ruler and therefore, did not tolerate their behavior. As a punishment, the king sent Kyon-u to the kingdom in the east to tend the cows and Chik-nyo to the west kingdom to weave. The couple wept so much the king finally gave them permission to see each other once in a year on the 7th day of the seventh moon.

When Kyon-u and Chik-nyo got to the Sivery River, they were disappointed because the river was so wide and there was no boats or bridge to cross over to see each other. Kyon-u and Chik-nyo’s tears fell to the earth resulting in floods. Fearing their lives and homes, crows and magpies decided to make a bridge with their wings wide open. Kyon-u and Chik-nyo stopped crying and rushed to each other to talk about the time of their separation. Since that time on the seventh day of the seventh month, crows and magpies are not seen on earth and it sprinkles a little in the morning of that day because Kyon-u and Chik-nyo shed tears as they part for the another year’s separation.


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(Created 2004; last update 7/12/11)



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